For Veterinarians: Antimicrobial Residues and Molecular Testing

Drug Residue Déjà Vu: Avoiding Residues in Milk and Cull Dairy Cows Dr. Pamela Ruegg, Dairy Science Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison While mastitis is the most common disease of adult dairy cows and accounts for most usage of antibiotics cows are also treated for other infectious diseases, including respiratory and uterine infections and infectious foot Read more about For Veterinarians: Antimicrobial Residues and Molecular Testing[…]

week EIGHT: Taking Sterile Milk Samples & The California Mastitis Test

Taking Sterile Milk Samples Background Part of mastitis control programs include microbiological analysis of milk from cows suspected of having mastitis. Culturing milk samples allows the identification of the bacteria that are causing the mastitis and the application of preventive management programs. Strict aseptic procedures must be used when collecting milk samples to avoid contamination Read more about week EIGHT: Taking Sterile Milk Samples & The California Mastitis Test[…]

week SEVEN: Relationship Between Teat-End Callosity or Hyperkeratosis and Mastitis

week SEVEN: Relationship Between Teat-End Callosity or Hyperkeratosis and Mastitis After repeated milkings, changes appear in teat-end tissue, resulting in the development of a callous ring around the teat orifice. Cow factors like teat-end shape, teat position, teat length, milk production, lactation stage, and parity show a relationship with callused teat-ends. The teat canal is the primary physical Read more about week SEVEN: Relationship Between Teat-End Callosity or Hyperkeratosis and Mastitis[…]

week SIX: All in the Design

week SIX: All in the Design Your teat dip cup’s style could affect your herd’s mastitis risk Proper milking procedures are critical for reducing mastitis spread in your herd. One aspect of consider is your teat dip cup’s design. The type of cup you use could affect your herd’s mastitis control rate.   …To read Read more about week SIX: All in the Design[…]

week THREE: Evaluation of Bovine Teat Condition in Commercial Dairy Herds

week THREE: Evaluation of Bovine Teat Condition in Commercial Dairy Herds: 1. Non-Infectious Factors Ohnstad4, M.D.Rasmussen2, L.Timms5, J.S.Britt5, R.Farnsworth5, N. Cook5 & T. Hemling5. “Teat Club International”, c/o F. Neijenhuis, Research Institute for Animal Husbandry Lelystad, The Netherlands. email: f.neijenhuis@pv.agro.nl Co-authors from: Australia1, Denmark2, The Netherlands3, UK4, USA5 ABSTRACT Classification of bovine teat condition can Read more about week THREE: Evaluation of Bovine Teat Condition in Commercial Dairy Herds[…]

week TWO: Addressing Teat Condition Problems

week TWO: Addressing Teat Condition Problems I. Ohnstad, G.A. Mein, J.R. Baines, M.D. Rasmussen, R. Farnsworth, B. Pocknee, T.C. Hemling and J.E. Hillerton Teat Club International Introduction In this paper the collective experience and knowledge of members of the Teat Club International have been applied to • describing effective treatments, changes in management or changes Read more about week TWO: Addressing Teat Condition Problems[…]

week ONE: A Tool Box for Assessing Cow, Udder and Teat Hygiene

week ONE: A Tool Box for Assessing Cow, Udder and Teat Hygiene Paper presented at the 2007 annual meeting of the NMC, by Nigel B. Cook and Douglas J. Reinemann University of Wisconsin-Madison Introduction Infection of the mammary gland with environmental bacterial pathogens is the most significant udder health problem facing the dairy industry in North Read more about week ONE: A Tool Box for Assessing Cow, Udder and Teat Hygiene[…]