animal welfare

April 19, 2015
Dairy Cow Welfare and Udder Health

Dr. Pamela Ruegg, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Production of high quality milk from healthy, well cared for animals is the goal of most dairy farmers. However, as fewer and fewer consumers are familiar with dairy farming, they have become more skeptical about the ability of farmers to properly care for farm animals. The purpose of this paper is to review the impact of mastitis and practices associated with mastitis control on dairy cow welfare.

Comparison of selected animal observations and management practices used to assess welfare of calves and adult dairy cows on organic and conventional dairy farms

J. Dairy Sci. 97 :1–12
M. A. Bergman, R. M. Richert , K. M. Cicconi-Hogan , M. J. Gamroth , Y. H. Schukken , K. E. Stiglbauer, and P. L. Ruegg
Differences in adoption of selected practices used in welfare assessment and audit programs were contrasted among organic herds and similarly sized conventional grazing herds, and conventional nongrazing herds.

tail docking

Effects of Tail Docking on Milk Quality and Cow Cleanliness

D.A. Schreiner and P.L. Ruegg, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Determines the effect of tail docking on somatic cell count, intramammary infection, and udder and leg cleanliness in commercial dairy herds.

Tail Docking and Animal Welfare

Dr. Pamela Ruegg, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Reviews current research about the behavioral and physiological effects of tail docking in dairy cattle.

Responses to Tail Docking in Calves and Heifers

D.A. Schreiner and P.L. Ruegg, Department of Dairy Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Determines the behavior and physiological effects of tail banding and atrophy using rubber rings 1 month before first parturition in dairy heifers both with and without the use of epidural anesthesia.